Tag Archives: 2nd place

Prayer

Let your knees melt and buckle. Let sorrow melt your heart. It is necessary to prepare the ground. Plant your memory as a seed and let it flourish in the light of love.


I am not a religious person, but I believe in the power of opening your heart to others when they need it. This is for a friend who is not yet an acquaintance, because I have a brother too.

This post was written in response to the Trifecta Writing Challenge weekly prompt:

You should write a creative response using the third definition of the given word. You must use the word in your response, and you must use it correctly. Your response can be no fewer than 33 and no more than 333 words. This week’s word is:

MELT (transitive verb)

1: to reduce from a solid to a liquid state usually by heat
2: to cause to disappear or disperse
3: to make tender or gentle : soften

 

Catharsis

In the end I fed his bones to the fire, down to the last tooth. And when the knock comes at my door, I will say truthfully: he has left me for good.


This post was made in response to the Trifecta Writing Challenge weekend Trifextra prompt, in which the editors asked us for a 33-word response that includes the word tooth, but is not a story about losing a tooth.

Fanning Flames

New to the Jade Dragon series? Start here! Go to beginning>>

Five men had died on board the airship. The Captain thought it had something to do with me, and she was probably right.

I met her eyes across the table. “My intent is to build toys. Clockwork diversions. Not — Not this.” I gestured at the burned-out shell, distant cousin to my own carefully crafted flash-bang.

“Nevertheless,” said the Captain, “your presence has endangered this ship and her crew. I am not accusing you of anything.” She held up a hand to forestall me. “But I must know who brought it aboard the Dragon, and how it came to be in my tiller hold. Could it have traveled the deck on its own? Or would someone have brought it in?”

I was already shaking my head. “No, no, of course not. It might have been hidden there before we launched, or rolled into the room later, I suppose. But it has no means of independent ambulation. See here –”

I picked up my flash-bang and twisted it, splitting into two pieces. “This spring here drives the gyroscope, and this one the lifting mechanism, but it is all completely self-contained. The shell unwinds, like so, the hammer strikes here, and the spark ignites the powder.”

The sharp keening of metal against metal startled me. Several of the crew were sidling carefully towards the back of the bridge, and the Lieutenant had drawn his sword halfway from its sheath. All eyes were on the flash-bang.

“Oh, no,” I hastened to reassure them. “There’s no powder in the chamber. I keep the combustible components separate from the mechanisms. I am not foolish enough to risk fire on an airship.” A silence followed. Of course, someone had done exactly that.

“Captain,” said Jax suddenly, a moment before the ship lurched.

I watched in horrified wonder as a glorious wave of red and gold sand swept like fire across the eastern sky straight towards the Dragon. Five crewmen were dead, and we needed to outrace a sandstorm.

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This post is part of the Jade Dragon series. Though I try to make these installments enjoyable as individual pieces, I highly recommend that you read the series from the beginning to really get what’s going on.

This post was written in response to the Trifecta Writing Challenge weekly prompt:

You should write a creative response using the given word. You must use the word in your response, and you must use it correctly. Your response can be no fewer than 33 and no more than 333 words. This week’s word is:

WONDER (noun)

1a : a cause of astonishment or admiration : marvel <it’s a wonder you weren’t killed> <the pyramid is a wonder to behold>
b : miracle
2 : the quality of exciting amazed admiration
3a : rapt attention or astonishment at something awesomely mysterious or new to one’s experience
b : a feeling of doubt or uncertainty

If you like this piece, you can vote for at the Trifecta Writing Challenge site through 7:00 AM Eastern (US) or 4:00 AM Pacific (US). Along the same lines, I’m always eager for comments and constructive criticism, so feel free to state your opinion here!

Perfect Pitch

My boy sings like an angle: all points and sharp edges, completely without subtlety. Each note is perfect, regardless of pitch, polish or purpose. No heavenly host could perform with such acute intensity.


This post was written in response to the Trifecta Writing Challenge weekend Trifextra prompt:

This weekend we’re asking you to write 33 words that will make us laugh or smile.  Even a chuckle will do.  We look forward to the communal spirit lifting.

The editors later posted: “Our prompt this weekend was either really timely or else really poorly timed. Laughter still needed, if anyone has any to spare.”

I couldn’t manage humor this weekend, but I hope the wordplay elicits a little smile. If you need a little extra boost, here’s the video from the concert that inspired my response. Mine is the loud one.

A Favor

Charts and optimal dates and preferential temperatures. One line or two. As if she could summon whatever it is that makes up the human soul as easily as she could a cab on a busy New York avenue.

And yet, that is exactly what she was hired to do. Joan sighed. She would not have taken this job, but an old acquaintance had called in a favor.

“It’s the last one, angel,” he promised.

She meant to refuse. She cursed his dark eyes and his charm. As usual, it did not help. So she took the bezoar and the woman’s cell number.

That woman sat across from her now, fidgeting with the tablecloth. She looked everywhere but at Joan, who had not been human for a long time.

“I’ll just take a bit of hair, then,” said Joan.


This post was written in response to Trifecta Writing’s Anniversary Challenge, and is co-sponsored by Velvet Verbosity! The editors paired up willing writers and gave them this assignment:

Start with these 38 words:

Charts and optimal dates and preferential temperatures. One line or two. As if she could summon whatever it is that makes up the human soul as easily as she could a cab on a busy New York avenue.

Team Member A (that’s me!) writes 33-100 words to continue the story, and posts it to Trifecta’s website. Team Member B then writes 33-100 words to finish it up.

I was lucky enough to be paired up with one of my favorite writers on the web right now: Jessie Powell, also known as Jester Queen. If you haven’t read her stuff, you should. If you haven’t voted for her to be America’s Next Author, you should. Seriously – she’s fantastic, and I can’t wait to see what she does with my 100 words.

Updated: Jessie posted her conclusion – if you can call it that. It’s more of a continuation, actually. Go visit her page to read the rest.